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Chilli Seeds

It is not known exactly when chillies were introduced into New Mexico. Chillies may have been used by the indigenous peoples as a medicine, a practice common among the Mayans.  By the time the Spanish arrived in Mexico, Aztec plant breeders had already developed dozens of varieties. According to historian Bernardino de Sahagùn, who lived in Mexico in 1529, "hot green chillies, smoked chillies, water chillies, tree chillies, beetle chillies, and sharp-pointed red chillies" existed.

Chilli fruits are considered vegetables when green, a spice when red and dried, but are berries botanically. Fruit characteristics (i.e., pungency, colour, shape, flavour, size, and use) usually classify chilli types. Despite vast trait differences, nearly all chilli varieties commercially cultivated in New Mexico belong to one species, C. annuum. Other species are the tabasco (C. frutescens) and habañero (C. chinense).  Several hundred chilli varieties of C. annuum are grown in New Mexico. These include bell, New Mexican, Jalapeño, Cayenne, Yellow Wax, Ancho, Pasilla, Mirasol, and De Arbol, but most of New Mexico's commercial acreage is limited to a few varieties.

Did you know?

New Mexican green and red chilli represent two developmental stages of the same fruit. First, the plant produces green fruits, which turn red if the pods are left on the plant. The red fruits are usually dried and ground into chilli powder (paprika if non-pungent). New Mexican green chilli is roasted and peeled for fresh consumption, canning or freezing. The flavour of green Chilli is completely different from red chilli because the pods are picked at a different age.  Green chilli cannot be transported long distances for fresh consumption because its quality will be reduced during shipping. Red chilli and paprika are dehydrated and sold as whole pods or ground into powder.

Paprika is currently used as colouring in sausages, cheeses, fruit gelatines, drugs, and cosmetics, as well as for improving the feather colour of flamingos in zoos! Good-quality paprika has high red colour, which is most important, and no pungency. Because paprika is defined as a product, not a pod-type in the U.S., it may be obtained from any one of many types of C. annuum. The word "paprika" means "Chilli" in Hungarian.

Chilli evolution

Chilli is native to the Western Hemisphere and probably evolved from an ancestral form in the Bolivia/Peru area. The first chillies consumed were probably collected from wild plants. Apparently the indigenous peoples were growing chilli plants between 5200 and 3400 B.C., which place chillies among the oldest cultivated crops of the Americas.

It is not known exactly when chillies were introduced into New Mexico. Chillies may have been used by the indigenous peoples as a medicine, a practice common among the Mayans.  By the time the Spanish arrived in Mexico, Aztec plant breeders had already developed dozens of varieties. According to historian Bernardino de Sahagùn, who lived in Mexico in 1529, "hot green chillies, smoked chillies, water chillies, tree chillies, beetle chillies, and sharp-pointed red chillies" existed.

Chilli fruits are considered vegetables when green, a spice when red and dried, but are berries botanically. Fruit characteristics (i.e., pungency, colour, shape, flavour, size, and use) usually classify chilli types. Despite vast trait differences, nearly all chilli varieties commercially cultivated in New Mexico belong to one species, C. annuum. Other species are the tabasco (C. frutescens) and habañero (C. chinense).  Several hundred chilli varieties of C. annuum are grown in New Mexico. These include bell, New Mexican, Jalapeño, Cayenne, Yellow Wax, Ancho, Pasilla, Mirasol, and De Arbol, but most of New Mexico's commercial acreage is limited to a few varieties.

 

 3  cups uncooked long-grain rice

3  tablespoons dried onion flakes

3  tablespoons dried parsley flakes

2 tablespoons dried bell pepper flakes

4  teaspoons beef bouillon granules

1  tablespoon minced dried chives

1  tablespoon dried celery flakes

1 1⁄2 teaspoons pepper

3⁄4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1⁄2 tablespoon garlic powder

3⁄4 teaspoon dried thyme

 

  1. HERE'S THE INSTRUCTIONS TO MAKE THE JAMBALAYA.
  2. In a saucepan bring 2 cups water to a boil.
  3. Stir in the contents of one jar of the dried mix, return to a boil.
  4. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 19 to 20 minutes or until rice is tender.
  5. In another saucepan heat 8 ounces of tomato sauce and one pound of fully cooked smoked sausage/chorizo that has been cut into 1/4 inch slices.
  6. Add one pound of medium, peeled, prawns and cook until pink.
  7. Combine both pans.
  8. More tomato sauce may be added if mixture is dry.

 

 

Chocolate Chilli Brownie

  1. Mix together flour, baking powder, and salt in a quart jar.
  2. Layer remaining ingredients in the order listed.
  3. Press each layer firmly in place before adding the next layer.
  4. Baking Instructions:
  5. 1 jar Brownie Mix in a Jar.
  6. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit (175 degrees Celsius).
  7. Grease and flour a 9x13inch baking pan.
  8. Empty jar of brownie mix into a large mixing bowl, and stir to blend.
  9. Mix in melted butter and eggs.
  10. Mix thoroughly.
  11. Spread batter evenly into prepared baking pan.
  12. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes in preheated oven.
  13. Cool completely in pan before cutting into 2 inch squares.

 

Chilli Con Carne

  1. Put beans into a jar or large bag.
  2. Combine spices into a small bag.
  3. Place the cans of tomato sauce and diced tomatoes in your gift basket.
  4. LABEL:.
  5. Wash beans. Put into pot with spices.
  6. Cook until done, about 1 to 1 1/2 hours.
  7. Meanwhile, brown 1 pound of ground beef and drain.
  8. Add meat, tomatoes and sauce to the beans.
  9. Simmer to blend flavors.